Let America Be America Again Essay

The Poem “Let America Be America Again” by Langston Hughes did not have a significant impact on individuals during the time of its publication which was on July 1936. Themes of the poem, including prejudice and racism cease to remain today in the United States. Because America is considered the land of the free and the land of equal opportunity, all individuals are given the same opportunities despite the way they may look or the things they believe in. Langston Hughes says: “I am the poor white, fooled and pushed apart; I am the Negro bearing slavery’s scars.

I am the red man driven from the land, I am the immigrant clutching the hope I seek (Hughes, 19-24). ” Although Langston Hughes conveys that certain groups of people in the past have been discriminated against and exploited, things have changed in society. Integration of blacks and whites has happened, people have learned from their mistakes and America is on its way to eliminating hate and discrimination. The “Poor White, fooled and pushed a part” represented lower class Americans who were overworked and exploited; in other words, the laborers and working class.

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The working class now has unions to back them up and to provide reasonable working conditions for their employees, although exploitation still occurs; it has improved significantly over time. The “Negro bearing slavery’s scars” represents African American men who were enslaved and abused because of the color of their skin; they were not given a fair chance at getting an education or living a happy life. Although it is true that African Americans were not treated equally in the past, times have changed.

African Americans have become respected and important individuals in America. The president of the United States comes from African American Decent and was trusted to lead this country. America has become more accepting and has grown to treat African Americans like they should have always been treated… like Citizens of this nation. The “red man driven from the land” (Hughes, 21) represents the Native Americans; this group of people was pushed away from their land to reservations so that America could expand its borders westward (Takaki, 167-192).

Native Americans have integrated into modern culture over time. Although Native Americans were mistreated in the past, they have made treaties with the government to regain their land and have grown to look to a new future. A new America in which everyone can live in peace and harmony was created. America has changed significantly when it comes to being prejudice. People are no longer stereotyped and discriminated against so often because of how they look. Ever since the civil rights movement, black and white integration was slowly developing into a part of America.

Black and white schools were being created, blacks and whites were able to ride the bus together, and equal opportunity was starting to open for all Citizens of the United States despite their color. In other Words; Education, Transportation, and human rights have become undeniable for all individuals. America has slowly become a nation of immigrants; it has become one of the most diverse nations in the world. Human beings are able to work together and live together in harmony despite the color of their skin, religious beliefs, and physical appearance.

America, unlike other nations like North Korea and Cuba, is a land of freedom in which any individual has the right to express themselves freely. All citizens of the United States are guaranteed freedom of speech, freedom of religion, right to privacy, ext. America still has an influx of immigrants from all over the world for a reason, it has changed. America has proven to become a land where people feel safe from wherever they may have immigrated from.

The main reason why many people flee their country is because the government is too corrupt, their poverty rate in their country is going up, or if they feel like they can give their family a better life somewhere else. Compared to other countries in the world at the time, America was a dream that many wanted to attain. For centuries, the American culture has been a beacon of hope to the oppressed peoples of collectivist economies and authoritarian or totalitarian governments throughout the world. Although the middle class in the Unites States is not as wealthy as it can be, they are able to maintain a decent lifestyle for themselves.

The poor and the lower class are provided with welfare and other forms of assistance from the government. The homeless are provided with homeless shelters so that no human being is kept on the streets without any type of help. Many nations do not provide these type of services to their people and thus making America, one of the most beneficial places to live in. People who enter the United States need to be willing to adjust to the culture that has been established, just as anyone would be expected to adjust to the customs and culture of any other country they would visit or live in.

Anyone who wants to come to the U. S. needs to respect and be willing to fit into the culture. During the early 20th century, immigrants from Northern and Western Europe continued to steadily arrive in the US, this was a common thing because they did this for the preceding three centuries. Immigrants from other countries began arriving in greater numbers, forming new communities and making it more easily able to find their own cultural niche within which to establish themselves.

Immigrants from Canada and Latin America, as well as Eastern and Southern European, flocked to US shores to escape racial, political and religious persecution in their homelands.

Works Cited

“Hughes, Langston. “Let America Be America Again. ” _Literature: An Introduction to Reading and Writing_. 4th ed. Eds. Edgar V. Roberts and Henry E. Jacobs. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall, 1995. 723-24. ” Takaki, Ronald (1993). A Different Mirror: A History of Multicultural America. New York: Back Bay Books. Fields, Barbara Jean. 1990. Slavery, Race, and Ideology in the United States of America.