Personal on a Return to Education Essay

Personal Essay on a Return to Education

Malick has long maintained a strong connection to both his education and his skill set.  Born and raised in the Caribbean, he began his education with a general and unbiased thirst for knowledge.  When midway through his secondary education he found himself increasingly predisposed toward the technical aspects of that which he was learning.  As a mechanically and technically gifted youth, he began to cultivate his interest in engineering and electronics.  In both, he found an outlet for his interests and his taletnts.

            He would parlay this interest into work as a Cable T.V. Engineering Technician. While the position was rewarding and did allow him to use some of his increasingly sharpened talents, Malick found that a growing emphasis on computer Information Technology in the electronic engineering field demanded a stronger educational background in these specific areas.  It would appear, as Malick engaged his work with enthusiasm, that a significant shift in technology focus had occurred.  He gained some working insight into “the vast and changing education and training needs of people throughout the world.  The context he would have to bear in mind is a world in which more and more people need access to continuous learning throughout their working lives.” (Daniel, xi)  This is a premise that would speak directly to Malick’s needs and ambitions.  It is thus that he began the process of entering back into the context of formal education.  First migrating to the Dutch Antilles where he could begin taking night classes and eventually driving him to make an entrance into this institution in order to earn a full degree, Malick is primarily motivated by the belief that his currently high level of ability will be refined and improved through further education.

            The opportunity to return to school was extremely exciting to Malick, given how much new information and knowledge the technology discipline would have to offer him.  He had come back to school with an understanding that “we have entered a new era in higher education, one that is rapidly drawing the academy into the age of automation.” (Noble, 107)  Malick determined that in the time he had been away from school, a great many developments both in the fields of technology and education had come together to cause significant progressive change in the world.  It was his determination that his abilities are well suited to this shift.  Therefore, he is returning to the educational fold in order to seize on the opportunities which are unique to these times.

         Here, in his first year in college, Malick has channeled his Information Technology major into a focus on Networking Technology and Security, both of which are outlets that currently dominate a field wide open with opportunities for participation and innovation.  Such is evident by points of optimism concerning the Information Technology markets even as other global markets slow considerably.  Accordingly, one study’s author “report details of our industry production accounts and show the critical

importance of IT capital deepening and education across U.S. industries.” (Jorgenson et al, 1)

         Essentially, Malick would come to school in consideration of the broad and varied horizon presented by a discipline in which he had already been quite skilled.  Armed with the practical refinement of his skills and a university degree to endorse these skills, Malick anticipates that his education will help to pave the way for an extremely rewarding life and career.

         Ultimately, the completion of his education will be a gratifying and important milestone in a bright future.

Works Cited

Daniel, J.S.  (1998).  Mega-universities and knowledge media:  technology strategies for higher education.  Routledge.

Jogrenson, D.W.; Ho, M.S & Stiroh, K.J.  (2002).  Information technology, education, and the sources of economic growth across U.S. industries.  The Brookings Institute.

Noble, D.F.  (1998).  Digital Diploma Mills:  The Automation of Education.  October, 86, 107-117.