The Unsupportive Lady Macbeth Essay

Lady Macbeth is a very egocentric woman. She fails to have any concern over Macbeth’s interests, and she does not consider his decisions. This lack of care for her husband is shown many times throughout the play, and it is more predominantly shown in the first two acts. Lady Macbeth believes that Macbeth has the same viewpoints as her. Because of this, instead of asking if he wants to do something, she tells him what they are going to do. If Macbeth tries to protest against her thoughts or actions, she convinces him to believe in her and do as she says using a variety of tactics.

Lady Macbeth does not have Macbeth’s best interest at heart because she manipulated him, she took matters into her own hand, and she did not think about Macbeth’s thoughts or feelings. Lady Macbeth has manipulated Macbeth into doing things he would not do otherwise. In Macbeth, everything that Lady Macbeth made Macbeth do contributed to the tragic ending of this classic dramatic piece. The first appearance of Lady Macbeth is in Act 1 Scene 5. At the beginning of this scene, she is reading a letter sent from Macbeth.

We Will Write a Custom Essay Specifically
For You For Only $13.90/page!


order now

One of the first things she says after reading the letter is “Hie thee hither, that I may pour my spirits in thine ear and chastise with the valour of my tongue all that impedes thee from the golden round” (I. v. 24-27). This quote gives us a first impression of Lady Macbeth. Before even consulting with Macbeth, she already knows that he will not want to kill King Duncan, so she is going to convince him using her words. Lady Macbeth successfully convinced Macbeth to kill Duncan, but when it was time to kill, Macbeth wanted to back out of their plan.

Even then, Lady Macbeth did not have any consideration for his opinions, so she tried to convince him by putting him down and saying “What beast was’t then that made you break this enterprise to me? When you durst do it, then you were a man. And to be more than what you were, you would be so much more the man. Nor time, nor place did then adhere, and yet you would make both. They have made themselves and that their fitness now Does unmake you” (I. vii. 47-54). Questioning his manhood really affected Macbeth, which made him not only agree to proceed with the murder, but it made him add to the assassination plan.

Lady Macbeth likes to take matters into her own hand. In order to kill Duncan, she wanted the “Spirits that tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here and fill me from the crown to the toe topfull of direst cruelty; make thick my blood, stop up th’access and passage to remorse that no compunctious visitings of nature shake my fell on purpose nor keep peace between th’effect and it. Come to my woman’s breasts and take my milk for gall, you murd’ring ministers, wherever in your sightless substances you wait on nature’s mischief.

Come, thick night, and pall thee in the dunnest smoke of hell, that my keen knife not see the wound it makes, nor heaven peep through the blanket of the dark, to cry, ‘Hold, hold’” (I. v. 30-53). When Lady Macbeth said this, she had already made a decision that she would kill Duncan, but she knew it would not be easy. She wanted the strength to do the evil task and she did not want anything to stop her; not sex, not goodness, nor the heavens. Shortly afterwards, Macbeth told Lady Macbeth of Duncan’s visit to the castle. Lady Macbeth wanted Macbeth to “look like th’innocent flower, but be the serpent under’t.

He that’s coming must be provided for, and you shall put this night’s great business into my dispatch” (I. v. 64-67). Instead of making the assassination a combined effort, she wants to do it by herself. Lady Macbeth does not care about Macbeth’s thoughts or feelings. Manipulating him and taking care of problems herself are two fine examples of this lack of consideration for Macbeth, as well as other examples in the play. Macbeth wanted to “Proceed no further in this business. He hath honour’d me of late, and I have bought golden opinions from all sorts of people, which would be worn now in their newest gloss, not cast aside so soon” (I. ii. 31-35). Macbeth revealed his thoughts and feelings about murdering Duncan to Lady Macbeth. He wanted to back out of the plan because he was already loved by the king and by others, so he does not want to spoil the feeling of being appreciated by so many. Even after this thorough explanation of why he did not want to proceed with the killing of Duncan, Lady Macbeth still made him do it, as she had her mind set on the king’s assassination. After the murder, Macbeth was traumatized by what he did, and he forgot to plant the daggers on the guards.

Lady Macbeth told him to go back, but he did not as he is afraid to look back on what he has done. Lady Macbeth then grabs the daggers to plant it on the guards herself but mocks him before she leaves saying “’tis the eye of childhood that fears a painted devil” (II. ii. 57-58), which means she thinks he is a child. The constant mockery of Macbeth shows how Lady Macbeth does not care about Macbeth’s feelings. Lady Macbeth is a manipulative wife that does not consider anyone’s feelings and that likes to do things herself with no help from others.

If Lady Macbeth had not deluded him into doing things he did not want to do, Macbeth would have been completely different. She convinced him to assassinate Duncan, which stained his mind and made him become a tyrant. This also led up to all the other murders hat Macbeth was responsible for. Lady Macbeth also very independent; she liked to make decisions and do things by herself. In addition, she constantly mocks Macbeth by questioning his bravery and masculinity. If Lady Macbeth had been more supportive of Macbeth, how would the play change?