The Veldt Essay

“The Veldt” Questions Setting 1. The setting of “The Veldt” is decisive for the story to progress. The story takes place in a futuristic age in which machines have taken over jobs originally done by humans. This meant the children (Wendy and Peter) felt distanced from their parents because machines helped them develop instead of their parents. It led them to believe that the machines were the ones that cared for them, and the machines were the things that they cannot live without. I wish you were dead,” was the acid statement that poured out of the mouth of Peter when his dad had the sense to turn the house off. When finally asked to choose they tossed their parents aside. The location of the story is also relevant to the story. The family lived in a house that satisfied their every need which made the parents seem unneeded. Also, there was a room called the “nursery” that could replicate any place the mind wanted, real or imaginary. This left even less room for the parents to help their own children.

The setting is the reason the children decided to kill their parents with no thought of the consequences. Character Sketch of Children 2. The children think, act, and disobey together. They do everything as a group so their characteristics are very similar. Both are spoiled, disobedient, and impulsive. They are so used to having whatever they want that when their parents threatened to turn off the machines, they killed them. They shift their loyalties to whoever gives them what they want and possesses no thoughts for other’s feelings. They are extremely disobedient and listens to no one.

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Even when George pleaded that they, “Open the door! ” they stubbornly allow the lions to do their jobs. They are impulsive and acts on the moment with no long-term planning. They never thought about whether the machines would break someday or whether Mr. McClean would turn it off. This would leave them with no ways to feed themselves. They never thought about how maybe someday they will remember how caring their parents were and regret the decision. All they did was act, not think. These are warnings by the author that spoiling the kids do more harm than good.

He believes that the more children get the more they want leading to vicious cycle that cannot be broken without extreme effects. How Suspense is Built 3. Suspense is built throughout the story in multiple ways. The foreshadowing was one of the ways the author built and kept the suspense up. For example, the story kept mentioning what the lions were eating. It isn’t until the end that the reader finds out the corpse are actually the conjured image of the parents. Also, the piercing screams that the parents kept hearing made the story full of nervous energy.

Again, it wasn’t until the end of the story that the reader finds out the screams were the parent’s. The characters make the story more suspenseful as the reader often wonders about the true loyalty of the children, whether they would prefer the machines to their parents. Finally, the setting of the story affects the suspense. The nursery conjured up Africa for most of the story. The African wildlife often symbolizes cruelness and death which makes one wonder if the story has anything to do with those ideas. Climax 4. Like most stories, the climax occurs fairly late in the plot.

It is when the parents ran downstairs after the children called them only to find that they were nowhere in sight. Many things can happen at that moment therefore there is a huge buildup of suspense. Could they be harmed by the lions? Or maybe they were planning to kill them. It continues with the parents waking mindlessly into the children’s trap. The doors of the nursery are shut and they are locked with hungry lions. At this point, all the foreshadowing finally dawns on the reader, and they wonder if the parents will live. It is the point where there is the most excitement.